About winderjssc

Jessica Winder has a background in ecological studies in both the museum and the research laboratory. She is passionate about the natural world right on our doorsteps. She is enthusiastic about capturing what she sees through photography and wants to open the eyes of everyone to the beauty and fascination of nature. She is author of 'Jessica's Nature Blog' at http://natureinfocus.wordpress.com. Jessica has also extensively researched macroscopic variations in oyster and other edible marine mollusc shells from archaeological excavations as a means of understanding past exploitation of marine shellfish resources. She is an archaeo-malacological consultant through Oysters etc. and is publishing summaries of her shell research work on the WordPress Blog called 'Oysters etc.' at http://oystersetcetera.wordpress.com 'Photographic Salmagundi' at http://photosalmagundi.wordpress.com is a showcase of photographs and digital art on all sorts of subjects - not just natural history.

Ferriters Cove on the Dingle Peninsula

Layers of upstanding Silurian rock on the beach

The mountains look down on the golden crescent of sand at Ferriters Cove. It is isolated and peaceful – where the sound of gently lapping waves is only occasionally broken by raucous calls when flocks of oyster catchers or herring gulls suddenly take flight.

Rock layers here stand up like stacked tombstones with wide knife edges, or stumps of strata with sharp points protrude from the surface like nails on a fakir’s bed. The rocks are fossiliferous marine Silurian sediments, from the Ferriters Cove Formation in the Dunquin Group, dating from between 423 and 395 millions of years ago. They are composed of pale brown, yellow, grey and red siltstones, mudstones, and sandstones. They were deposited in a shallow sea with active volcanoes on its shore and hinterland, which produced volcanic deposits such as lava and tuffs.  The character of the rocks changes as you walk along the beach. Fossils such as brachiopods, corals, and trilobites are found in the mudstones.

Patterns in the Sand at Inch Strand

Natural sand ripple patterns

Inch Strand is a wide beach on a sand spit that reaches out like a peninsula into the sea at right angles to the mainland on the South Coast of the Dingle Peninsula in Ireland. We walked the entire five kilometres of dune-backed shore as the tide was receding. By the time we turned back from the tip of the spit, the ebbing sea had left behind acres and acres of wonderful patterns in the sand, in sculptural forms the like of which I have never seen before. I was totally captivated by these designs, looking as did like elaborate knitting or crochet stitching. Here are just a couple of examples of the patterns in the sand.

Natural sand ripple patterns

Natural sand ripple patterns

Natural sand ripple patterns

Natural sand ripple patterns

Natural sand ripple patterns

Dunmore Head on the Dingle Peninsula

View of Slea Head on the Dingle PeninsulaPhotographs of the amazing Dunmore Head on the Dingle Peninsula on the West Coast of Ireland where the swell of azure blue waves crashes in white surf against the steeply sloping beds of Devonian strata in the cliffs, and breaks on the pinnacle-sharp rocks below. A small sandy cove, incredibly accessible even by car, is where visitors are privileged to picnic, build sand castles, brave the surf on boards, play among the rocks, and marvel at the views.

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2014

All Rights Reserved

Ventry Beach on the Dingle Peninsula

Gallery

This gallery contains 16 photos.

Just a few pictures from my visit to Ventry Beach on the Dingle Peninsula on the west Coast of Ireland yesterday selected from the 480 photographs I took! The weather was amazing for September and I was able to spend … Continue reading

Oxford Sandy & Black Pigs

I had a wonderful day out at the Dorset County Show yesterday. It was great fun, very noisy, very busy, and too much to see in just one day. The warm sunny weather meant that it was really well attended and there was a sea of people as far as the eye could see – all having a good time. I especially enjoyed getting up close to all the farm animals – like these delightful Oxford Sandy and Black Pigs from the Ansty Herd near Dorchester. The piglets were really cute. Children just loved putting their fingers through the enclosure mesh to tickle the piglets, and the piglets seemed to be pleased with all the attention.

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2014

All Rights Reserved

Beach Boulders at Eype 3

Another gallery of rock pictures from Eype beach. I hope the photographs in this and preceeding posts on the same subject will prove a useful resource for students of geology as well as those interested in the aesthetics of geology.

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2014

All Rights Reserved