Driftwood at Three Mile Beach

Bleached white driftwood washed ashore at Three Mile Beach in Port Douglas, Queensland, Australia.

Bleached white driftwood tree washed ashore on Three Mile Beach at Port Douglas on the Queensland Coast in Australia. The wood was riddled with holes and tunnels made by shipworm.

Three Mile Beach at Port Douglas in Queensland, Australia

Bleached white driftwood washed ashore at Three Mile Beach in Port Douglas, Queensland, Australia.

Shipworm holes in driftwood

Shipworm holes in driftwood

Shipworm holes in driftwood

Shipworm holes in driftwood

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Beach Casuarina or Coastal She-oak

Fruit of the Beach Casuarina or Coastal She-oak

The Beach Casuarina or Coastal She-oak (Casuarina equisetifolia) is a common plant on Australian tropical beaches. It can occur as a shrub or a tree. It is often the first plant to colonise this basically unfriendly habitat and, although wispy and fairly insubstantial in growth, it provides welcome shade. It looks as if it might be some kind of pine with long drooping needles but in fact the ‘pine needles’ are thin articulated branchlets. In the close-up photographs below you can see that the branchlets resemble the stems of the Horsetail plants (Equisetum spp.) – primitive plants dating back to the Carboniferous Period from which we know them in fossil form in coal measures and similar rocks – they even share similar Latin names.

The leaves of the Beach Casuarina are barely noticeable, being very small indeed and growing with even spacing along the stems from which the branchlets arise. You can see these scale-like leaves if you click to enlarge, for example, the photograph in the gallery below Beach Casuarina 7. The plant has unobtrusive and separate male and female flowers. Male flowers are white at the end of the branchlets while the female flowers are small and red and grow on special side branchlets. The fertilised female flowers develop into small, hard spiky fruits, with some similarity to pine cones [and also strikingly reminiscent in outline shape of the hairstyle favoured by Lisa Simpson and her baby sister Maggie].

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Mangrove or Nypa Palm

Mangrove, Nipa, or Nypa Palm growing in brackish water

These are images of the Mangrove, Nipa, or Nypa palm (Nypa fruticans) which is the only palm thought to be fully adapted to growing in the mangrove biome. It is shown here growing in soft mud under brackish water at the edge of Freshwater Lake (one of the Centenary lakes) at Cairns Botanic Gardens in Queensland, Australia.

Mangrove, Nipa, or Nypa Palm growing in brackish water

Fruit of the Mangrove Palm dangling in the water

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Beach Barringtonia Boxfruits

Fibrous remains of a Boxfruit from the Beach Barringtonia mangrove tree on a coral beach

These odd objects were found on the beaches at Normanby Island and Cape Tribulation on the Queensland Coast in Australia. They are large woody, angular fruits of the Beach Barringtonia mangrove tree (Barringtonia asiatica). As you can see from the photographs, they get washed up in varying stages of decomposition – anything from the perfect brown box shape with extended corners to a simple mass of fibrous material – sometimes with small sea creatures like colonial Bryozoa or stalked barnacles attached.

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Kewarra Beach

Goat's Foot Morning Glory flower on the beach

This post represents my first visit to the Australian shoreline. Kewarra Beach, just north of Cairns on the Queensland Coast, is fairly typical of the beaches in the area. You can see from the pictures that it was virtually deserted. Even though the temperature was hot, hot, hot, it was also steamy; for the most part, a dull day with rain clouds tumbling down from the mountains.

Rainforest trees come right down to the sand – and as with the mangroves bordering the river, the tangled networks of roots are exposed. Ideal territory for salt water crocodiles – there is even a notice warning of recent sightings. Thinking that one of the dreaded creatures is possibly lurking somewhere – ready to dart out of concealment for a meal – certainly takes the edge off the idea of paddling or exploring the woods by the shore.

The tide had washed in driftwood, dead fish, coconuts, and strange jawbones. Delicate purple-tinged clams rolled on the surf; oysters clustered on rock; and tiny Sand Bubbler Crabs popped in and out of burrows – scattering small balls of sand in linear patterns on the beach. In this paradise, pink Goat’s Foot Morning Glory flowers decorated the grey rip-rap used as a sea defence.

View of tropical beach with rain clouds

Fish jaw bone on the beach

Trees growing on a sandy beach

Exposed tangled network of tree roots

Australian native rock oysters on a beach boulder

Close-up image of native rock oysters on a boulder

Exposed tree roots on a sandy beach

Driftwood on a sandy Australian beach

Trees with exposed roots growing on a sandy beach

Sign warning of dangerous crocodiles

Dead fish washed up on sandy beach

Sand Bubbler Crab and seashells

Mangrove-lined river flowing onto the beach

Small river estuary with mangroves

Sky, sea, surf, and sand

Small living clam found rolling in the surf

Coconut with husk washed ashore

Tropical trees at the top of a sandy beach

Rip-rap rocks on a tropical beach

Flowering Morning Glory vine on the beach

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Arty Fish at Cairns

Cairns fish celebrated in ceramic art form on Cairns Esplanade pavement

The Cairns Inlet on the Queensland coast is obviously a habitat both rich and diverse. This wonderful natural environment is celebrated by the artist Jennie Scott (2003) in a fabulous and fun ceramic artwork that is embedded in the pavement at Skippers Cafe and Muddy’s Playground (the childrens’ water park) on the Cairns Esplanade. It features examples of all the creatures that live in and on the water just offshore, and that includes fish of all sorts – as you can see from the pictures here.

Cairns fish celebrated in ceramic art form on Cairns Esplanade pavement

Cairns fish celebrated in ceramic art form on Cairns Esplanade pavement - fish shown with snake

Cairns fish celebrated in ceramic art form on Cairns Esplanade pavement

Cairns fish celebrated in ceramic art form on Cairns Esplanade pavement - fish shown with sharks and dolphins

Cairns fish celebrated in ceramic art form on Cairns Esplanade pavement

Cairns fish celebrated in ceramic art form on Cairns Esplanade pavement - the Title piece of the pavement mosaic

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A Fish at Cairns

A dead fish on a sandy tropical beach

Maybe this was the fish that got away from the net fisherman shown in the previous post. I guess that it wouldn’t have remained on the beach for long – too many small scavengers like crabs living on the mud flats would have thought it a food bonanza – if one of the local ‘salties’ (crocodiles) didn’t snap it up first as a snack. Visitors to the seashore in Cairns are told not to gut fish on the beach or leave food around after barbecues and picnics because the food attracts crocodiles – which of course is dangerous as they are as likely to eat the people as the discarded fish remains!

A dead fish on a sandy tropical beach

A dead fish on a sandy tropical beach

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2013

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