Cockle & Mussel Shells at Whiteford (25.07.13)

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

Cockle shells and mussel shells on a sandy seashore

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COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2013

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Oyster Shells at Whiteford (25.07.13)

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Click on the pictures to enlarge them and view the descriptions.

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2013

All Rights Reserved

Ancient Forest Remains at Whiteford

Old tree trunks in beach deposits at Whiteford Sands

Not a lot of people seem to know that the remains of old trees are slowly emerging from the glacial and post glacial deposits at Whiteford Sands as the surface layers of the  beach have been eroding in recent decades – or at least I have been unable to find any published reference to their gradual exposure in this location. In fact, last winter (2012/2013) produced significant changes to the appearance of the beach towards the Point, with massive quantities of sand being stripped away and redeposited elsewhere. Subsequently, many new examples of old wood were revealed on the shore.

I believe that these boughs and trunks could be further remains of woodland that was inundated and buried in sediment following the last period of glaciation in Gower. Better known examples are the tree stumps of the submerged woodland at Broughton Bay, which is the next bay along the Loughor Estuary in the direction of the Bristol Channel. The whole area is known to have been covered in woodland about 10,000 years ago.

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2013

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Driftwood at Whiteford Point 1

Aspect of a piece of driftwood on a sandy beach with pebbles

What makes this piece of driftwood special is the probability that it is a remnant of a submerged ancient forest that once stood where this beach now lies, and could date back 10,000 years.

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2013

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Some feathers at Whiteford Point

Two dew-laden white feathers in a heart shape on a sandy beach.

Two dew-covered white feathers lying on the beach at Whiteford Sands, Gower, South Wales. It was a misty June morning when I spotted these feathers which were coincidentally arranged into a heart shape. Maybe it was something to do with the salt in the air, as much as to do with the fineness of the plumules of this downy feather, that so many individual droplets of moisture had formed on one small feather.

A bunch of white and grey plucked feathers on a sandy beach

They were just a couple from a whole bunch of feathers scattered on the sand. It looked as if all the  grey and white plumes had been freshly plucked from a bird. There were no bones or meat. I wondered if a bird of prey had been roughly preparing the dead bird before taking it to the nest to feed young.

A group of white, grey and black feathers on wet sand.

Several larger, blunt-ended, black-tipped feathers amongst the small soft, downy ones look as if they might be from the tail of the bird. I will have to defer to any expert ornithologist reading this to identify the bird from which the feathers have been plucked and possible perpetrator. 

Dew drops covering a downy white feather on a sandy beach

Revised version of a post from 12 July 2009

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2013

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