Eype Beach Stream 3

Little pebble bridges over a beach stream

On the western half of the shore at Eype in Dorset, England, the cliff is basically made up of porous yellow sandstones and limestones, belonging to the Middle Jurassic Down Cliff Sand Member and Thorncombe Sand Member, overlying the pale, blue-grey micaceous silty mudstone and shale known as the Eype Clay Member. All three members belong to the Dyrham Formation.  Rainwater soaks down through the upper porous rocks but, when it reaches the lower clay-based strata, it seeps out to the surface and drains away down the cliff face to the shore in numerous small streams.

The picture above, and the short video clip below, show one of these little streams running over the clay where someone has artistically constructed small pebble bridges over the flow. The last image in the post illustrates the general appearance of the cliff face with the small streams issuing from the lower layers.

Blue-grey clay and yellow sandstone strata at Eype Beach

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Just a Common Whelk Shell (3)

Lots of barnacles on a whelk shell

Whelk shell with an encrustation of mostly acorn barnacles – some complete with all plates and in other areas only the basal plate remains

Acorn Barnacles (Cirripedia) settle on almost anything in the sea or on the seashore. These images show the empty shell of a Common Whelk (Buccinum undatum) that I picked up on the beach at Rhossili on the Gower Peninsula in South Wales – it has proved to be an ideal substrate for them.

The outer surface of the shell is almost entirely covered with barnacles. The majority are intact with the lateral and also the terminal plates. Many specimens are mature but there are juveniles too. In one area, the barnacles have been knocked off but you can still see the basal plates by which they were attached. Some barnacles may have been living on this common British seashell while it was still alive. However, it is equally possible that the shell became colonised by barnacles once it was empty. The few calcareous tubes of marine worms which are stuck on the inner surface of the aperture or mouth of the shell would have settled there once the whelk flesh had disappeared.

The close-up shots reveal the details of the structure of the barnacles, made up generally from six fixed lateral plates overlapping each other to form the shell for the animal, with four articulating terminal plates forming the lid to the chamber. The whole barnacle shell is in this instance securely attached to the whelk shell by a basal plate that often remains in place even when the barnacle becomes detached. Not all species of barnacle have a basal plate.

The macro-photographs also show the intricate pattern and texture of the whelk shell surface with a regular criss-crossing of ridges. This gives an almost lattice-like effect where the growth lines intersect with the natural ornamentation or sculpturing of the shell. In close-up, it is also possible to see small areas of the colonial microscopic animals called Bryozoa or Sea Mats (resembling fragments of lace) which are clinging to the bases of some of the barnacle shells.

Macro-photograph of growth lines and natural sculpturing on a whelk shell

Close-up image of pattern and texture in a barnacle-encrusted whelk shell

Barnacle encrustation on a whelk shell

Whelk shell with mature and juvenile barnacles attached

Macro-photograph of growth lines and natural sculpturing on a whelk shell

Close-up image of growth lines and natural sculpturing in a barnacle-encrusted whelk shell

Apertural view of epibiont encrustation hard parts on a Common Whelk shell

Whelk shell with barnacles attached to the outside and calcareous tubes inside

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2014

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Mother of Pearl 2

Mother of pearl decorative inlay on a 16th century Japanese coffer

Mother of Pearl from tropical seashells decorates this fabulous Kyoto Japanese coffer made for the European market around the end of the 16th century and beginning of the 17th century. The pieces of rainbow-hued iridescent shell are held in place by gilded copper rivets on a black and gold lacquered wood base (On display in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; FE.33-1983).

Mother of pearl decorative inlay on a 16th century Japanese coffer

Mother of pearl decorative inlay on a 16th century Japanese coffer

Mother of pearl decorative inlay on a 16th century Japanese coffer

Mother of pearl decorative inlay on a 16th century Japanese coffer

Mother of pearl decorative inlay on a 16th century Japanese coffer

Mother of pearl decorative inlay on a 16th century Japanese coffer

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2014

All Rights Reserved

Mother of Pearl 1

Ornamental iridescent veneer of mother-of pearl on an 18th century  bureau-bookcase

Mother of pearl is a wonderful iridescent material that is frequently used for artistic purposes. It comes from the inner surface of certain shells, sometimes gastropods like the Button Top Shell, and other times from bivalves such as the Freshwater Pearl Mussel. The inner or nacreous layer of certain shells is composed of crystals which are arranged in layers that reflect light in an attractive way. The colours reflected, and the intensity of the sheen, depend on the type of shell from which it has been obtained and also on the quality of light to which it is exposed. The same piece of mother of pearl can look different in different lights.

The photographs here show the details of the decorative veneer on a bureau-bookcase probably made in Mexico between 1780 and 1820. This is one of many fine items of antique furniture displayed in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. The veneer is composed of about 7,000 individual pieces of shell, each piece from a separate individual shell (most likely freshwater mussel), and each one having taken about 40 minutes to prepare and shape. The shape of every shimmering piece is highlighted to great effect by a very narrow border of contrasting dark wood.

Ornamental iridescent veneer of mother-of pearl on an 18th century  bureau-bookcase

Ornamental iridescent veneer of mother-of pearl on an 18th century  bureau-bookcase

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2014

All Rights Reserved

Lyme 8

 

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Lyme 7

 

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