Rock Patterns & Textures at Tenby – Part 5

Green and red biofilm encrusting cave walls at Tenby

It was exciting to discover all the caves at South Beach in Tenby. The rock layers of the cliffs, which were originally laid down in horizontal layers at the bottom of ancient seas millions of years ago, have been subsequently pushed on-end by earth movements so that they now lie at very steep angles to the vertical. The waves have worked away in weaker areas between the strata and excavated small caves. I couldn’t wait to see inside them. They were variable in size but larger than I expected. Well worth exploring.

The floors were mainly sand, smoothed by the previous high tide. Sometimes pebbles were piled up against the back wall. I was mostly struck by how different they looked from one cave to the next. Some cave walls were almost polished, smooth, pale grey limestone, revealing irregular streaks of white calcite veining, occasionally with fossils. Others were roughly hewn with multiple broken facets.

Most intriguing of all were the mosaics of bright green and deep red organic encrustations coating some walls. I couldn’t work out the rationale for their seemingly ad hoc distribution. I am not sure what they are. Maybe they are cyanobacterial bio-films rather than encrusting algae – because of the location in which they are growing so high on the shore and away from light.

[There are in fact encrusting dark red forms of alga but these seem to be restricted to low shore situations in shallow water. Identification of these kinds of organisms is difficult, because they are not a distinct taxonomic group but are represented by a variety of different genera; and maybe I need to take some samples for examination under the microscope].

The pale grey Hunts Bay Oolite Subgroup limestone of the most western stretch of South Beach, which has most of the caves, eventually gives way to other rocks further east – like the Caswell Bay Mudstones which are more thinly bedded with a variety of colours and textures, and these house perhaps the largest cave – the last one of note before you reach Castle Beach and Castle Hill that act as a divider between South Beach and North Beach in Tenby.

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Rock Patterns & Textures at Tenby – Part 4

This is the fourth part of the series of rock texture pictures from Tenby. All so far have been from South Beach where the Carboniferous strata range from Hunts Bay Oolite, to High Tor Limestone, to Caswell May Mudstones, and Gully Oolite. Many of these close-up images have shown erosion patterns, caused sometimes biologically and sometimes chemically, or a combination of both. The first four photographs in this post show the fine, and approximately-linear ridges and grooves (click the pictures to enlarge them for a better view), that seem to be restricted to the otherwise smoother, un-pitted, darker patches on the surface of the rock. I am thinking that whereas the pits are probably caused by various effects of bio-erosion or bio-erosion plus solution, the almost microscopic grooves here could be the result of chemical erosion which sometimes occurs from contact with acid rain. If so, these micro grooves and ridges are microrills, and like miniature rillenkarren – a feature of karst topography – and they are evidence for relatively recent erosional activity.

The patterns of grooves and fissures in the four images below, could also be a karstic type of solution feature. I am not sure – but they are certainly intriguing and look to my eye rather like the tough wrinkled hides of elephant or rhinoceros.

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Rock Patterns & Textures at Tenby – Part 3

This is the third in a series about the textures and patterns in rocks belonging to the Carboniferous Period and exposed in the cliffs at Tenby in South Wales. These photographs illustrate that erosion can happen on several size scales on the same rock surface, with tiny erosional pits (measuring in only millimetres and barely visible to the naked eye) superimposed on slightly larger scale pits (measuring in centimetres). [Don't forget that you can click on a picture to enlarge it and see a description].

The pitted type of erosional surface, as shown in the images above and below, is probably the result of bio-erosion. However, in the red rocks, If I have identified the stratum and understood the textbooks correctly, then the fine erosional pitting is now taking place on top of fracturing and other features that may indicate exposure of the stratum to wave action and weathering an a much earlier geological time period.

Surface texture and pattern like elephant skin in Carboniferous Limestone

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Rock Patterns & Textures at Tenby – Part 2

Black lichen growing on pitted limestone cliff surface

More natural patterns and textures in rocks from South Beach cliffs at Tenby in South Wales. Organisms like bacteria and lichen that grow on the surface of rock (as shown in some of these photographs) can be agents of erosion, especially those species capable of penetrating the first few millimetres of the surface of the substrate: their growing habits can result in a weakening of the rock surface. Small gastropod molluscs such as periwinkles feed on the bio-film created by the bacteria, lichens, and other organisms like algae and fungi. Those molluscs with particularly hard radula teeth, for example limpets, actually remove small particles of the weakened rock along with their food. This minor activity over long periods of time contributes to the wearing down of the rock surface and the production of a pitted surface. Erosion of rock by biological phenomena is referred to as bio-erosion and it occurs in conjunction with other chemical and mechanical erosional processes.

White-veined limestone with pitting in a cliff face

Patches of black lichen on naturally fractured and erosionally pitted limestone

Triangular patterns of natural fractures in limestone

Gastropod fossils embedded in limestone cliffs at Tenby

Bacterial discolouration on an eroding limestone surface

Dark patches of rock colonised by bacteria on the eroding surface of naturally fractured limestone

Dark patches of rock colonised by bacteria on the naturally-fractured and eroding surface of limestone

P.S. Don’t forget that you can click on the pictures to enlarge them and see a description of the image.

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Rhossili Beach Stream Patterns 1

Just a Common Whelk Shell (3)

Lots of barnacles on a whelk shell

Whelk shell with an encrustation of mostly acorn barnacles – some complete with all plates and in other areas only the basal plate remains

Acorn Barnacles (Cirripedia) settle on almost anything in the sea or on the seashore. These images show the empty shell of a Common Whelk (Buccinum undatum) that I picked up on the beach at Rhossili on the Gower Peninsula in South Wales – it has proved to be an ideal substrate for them.

The outer surface of the shell is almost entirely covered with barnacles. The majority are intact with the lateral and also the terminal plates. Many specimens are mature but there are juveniles too. In one area, the barnacles have been knocked off but you can still see the basal plates by which they were attached. Some barnacles may have been living on this common British seashell while it was still alive. However, it is equally possible that the shell became colonised by barnacles once it was empty. The few calcareous tubes of marine worms which are stuck on the inner surface of the aperture or mouth of the shell would have settled there once the whelk flesh had disappeared.

The close-up shots reveal the details of the structure of the barnacles, made up generally from six fixed lateral plates overlapping each other to form the shell for the animal, with four articulating terminal plates forming the lid to the chamber. The whole barnacle shell is in this instance securely attached to the whelk shell by a basal plate that often remains in place even when the barnacle becomes detached. Not all species of barnacle have a basal plate.

The macro-photographs also show the intricate pattern and texture of the whelk shell surface with a regular criss-crossing of ridges. This gives an almost lattice-like effect where the growth lines intersect with the natural ornamentation or sculpturing of the shell. In close-up, it is also possible to see small areas of the colonial microscopic animals called Bryozoa or Sea Mats (resembling fragments of lace) which are clinging to the bases of some of the barnacle shells.

Macro-photograph of growth lines and natural sculpturing on a whelk shell

Close-up image of pattern and texture in a barnacle-encrusted whelk shell

Barnacle encrustation on a whelk shell

Whelk shell with mature and juvenile barnacles attached

Macro-photograph of growth lines and natural sculpturing on a whelk shell

Close-up image of growth lines and natural sculpturing in a barnacle-encrusted whelk shell

Apertural view of epibiont encrustation hard parts on a Common Whelk shell

Whelk shell with barnacles attached to the outside and calcareous tubes inside

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