Oyster Shells at Whiteford (25.07.13)

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Click on the pictures to enlarge them and view the descriptions.

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

Oyster shell (Ostrea edulis Linnaeus) on the beach at Whiteford Sands

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2013

All Rights Reserved

Arrangements of Seashells

Arrangement of Seashells 1 - Mostly small variegated scallop shells with a Manila Clam, top shells, and sea glass, in a bowl of water - common British seashells.

I really like to look at shells and have them around me. I often discover the odd shell in my pocket as a souvenir of a trip to the beach. Sometimes I will collect empty shells in larger numbers where this is permitted. The pictures in this post show different assortments and arrangements of common British seashells that have decorated my home from time to time over the last couple of years.

There are many posts on Jessica’s Nature Blog about seashells – sometimes just showing pretty pictures (like here) but often also describing their identifying features and other information. Click here if you would like to browse through more than 60 SEASHELL POSTS.

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2013

All Rights Reserved

Mud Creepers

Mud Creepers (1) -  Empty shell of Telescopium telescopium L., Mud Whelk, at Cairns, Queensland, Australia, with remains of an oyster shell and barnacles attached.

Telescopus by Dominic Johns - A sculpture on the esplanade at Cairns, Queensland, Australia. Mud Creepers are a common sight on the tidal mud flats at Cairns in Queensland, Australia. Also called Telescope Shells, Mudwhelks, Telescopic Creepers, or Mangrove Mud Whelk. The Latin name is Telescopium telescopium L. They are so emblematic of the place that they have been glorified by a fantastic piece of sculpture by Dominic Johns on the Esplanade.

The reality, however, is that this large gastropod marine mollusc – living on the glutinous muds exposed by the ebbing tide – is not the most attractive of seashore creatures, in fact, a bit creepy. It is dark in colour, about 6 inches long, and the shell is very thick and heavy, The protruding muscular foot and tubular siphon of the animal are hard to distinguish from the mud itself but I believe the flesh is edible.

Telescopus by Dominic Johns - A sculpture on the esplanade at Cairns, Queensland, Australia.This sea snail seems to struggle as it drags its weighty shell across the mud in strange irregular movements without the supporting medium of water. The furrows incidentally ploughed by the shells leave networks of trails on the mud. In life the shells are often caked with mud but empty shells washed up on the beach show there is actually a great striped pattern.

Mud Creepers (2) - Empty shell of the Mud Whelk or Mud Creeper, Telescopium telescopium L held to show the apertural end at Cairns, Queensland, Australia.

Mud Creepers (3) -  Empty shell of Telescopium telescopium L., Mud Whelk, on the shore at Cairns, Queensland, Australia.

Mud Creepers (4) -  Empty shell of Telescopium telescopium L., Mud Whelk, on the shore at Cairns, Queensland, Australia, with remains of an oyster shell and barnacles attached.

Mud Creepers (5) -  Empty shell of Telescopium telescopium L., Mud Whelk, on the shore at Cairns, Queensland, Australia.

Mud Creepers (6) -  Empty shells of Telescopium telescopium L., Mud Whelk, on the shore at Cairns, Queensland, Australia. One shell has barnacles attached.

Mud Creepers (7) -  Empty shell of Telescopium telescopium L. on the beach at Cairns, Queensland, Australia, with fiddler crabs.

Mud Creepers (8) - Empty shell of Telescopium telescopium L., Mud Whelk, on the shore at Cairns, Queensland, Australia. The shell has barnacles attached.

Mud Creepers (9) - The tidal mudflats at cairns, Queensland, Australia - habitat of Telescopium telescopium L., the Mud Creeper, Mud Whelk, Telescopic Creeper, or Mangrove Mud Whelk.

Mud Creepers (10) - The tidal mudflats at Cairns, Queensland, Australia - habitat of Telescopium telescopium L., the Mud Creeper, Mud Whelk, Telescopic Creeper, or Mangrove Mud Whelk.

Mud Creepers (11) - The tidal mudflats at Cairns, Queensland, Australia - habitat of Telescopium telescopium L., the Mud Creeper, Mud Whelk, Telescopic Creeper, or Mangrove Mud Whelk.

Mud Creepers (12) - Living specimen of Telescopium telescopium L., the Mangrove Mud Whelk, crawling through the glutinous mud at low tide, its heavy shell making a furrow behind it as it is dragged along, Cairns, Queensland, Australia.

Mud Creepers (13) - Trails left in the mud where living Telescopium telescopium Mangrove Mud Whelks have dragged their heavy shells along when the tide is out.

Mud Creepers (14) - Empty shell of Telescopium telescopium L. on the beach at Cairns, Queensland, Australia.

Mud Creepers (15) - Empty shell of Telescopium telescopium L. on the beach at Cairns, Queensland, Australia.

Mud Creepers (16) - Empty shell of Telescopium telescopium L. on the beach at Cairns, Queensland, Australia.

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2013

All Rights Reserved

Shelly Perspectives

Digitally altered macro-photographs of natural patterns and textures in bivalved seashells.

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2012

All Rights Reserved

Cockle Shells

Just a snapshot of some multi-coloured shells of the common edible cockle, Cerastoderma edule (Linnaeus).

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2012

All Rights Reserved 

Images of a small striped mussel shell

I really loved the way the light shone through this small mussel shell on my window sill. We normally think of mussel shells as being dull and blue-black in colour but younger, smaller, specimens have more interesting patterns and colours – like this one with its pale cream shell and chequered pattern of blue stripes. The outer, horny, papery periostracum can been see as an irregular buff colour patchy coating.




COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2012

All Rights Reserved 

Common Whelk shells with barnacles attached

The shells of the Common Whelk, Buccinum undatum Linnaeus, are shown here with an encrustation of acorn barnacle shells. I often display the shells and other beachcombings I bring home from the seashore in bowls and baskets on my window sill; and these make suitable containers in which to photograph objects for the Jessica’s Nature Blog.

I particularly like dishes with glazes that remind me of the seashore; so I was delighted when I discovered the beautiful blue/green glazed terracotta platter that I have used for today’s photograph. It is made by a studio potter called Rosemarie James who uses layers of rich-coloured glazes to create a depth, richness and movement that is reminiscent of the sea, the sky, and natural forms along the Dorset coast. A perfect complement and frame to the natural shell forms. 

COPYRIGHT JESSICA WINDER 2012

All Rights Reserved