Water Patterns at St Peter Port

Natural patterns of reflected light on water ripples

Fleeting patterns of reflected light on wind-driven ripples across the surface of the seawater in St Peter Port Harbour on Guernsey in the Channel Islands make natural abstract designs in never-ending variations.

Sand Patterns near Picquerel Point 2

Some more images showing the subtle colour transitions and delicate branching patterns that characterise the low relief natural sculptures in the fine clean sand on the shore near Picquerel Point at Grand Havre in the Channel Island of Guernsey. The dendritic patterns have been created by sea water draining down the beach as the tide recedes; and this has led to a sorting out of particles by size, weight, and colour. The darker sediments that outline and emphasise the design may be organic remnants or different darker minerals. These patterns are the best of their type that I have seen – perhaps due to the very fine sand. The patterns are so delicate they could almost be drawings.

Click on any image to view in larger format in a gallery.

Fourchu Head Rocks Part 5

Part 5 of a series of photographs taken at Fourchu Head on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, Canada, showing details of rocky outcrops and beach stones composed of very ancient Neoproterozoic volcanic rock. They are all made from volcanic ash that was spewed from the volcanoes together with shattered pieces of rock that broke away from the bedrock with the explosive force of the eruption. The rusty coloured streaks in some of the rocks are due to oxidising iron minerals. It is possible that rocks brought to the area from much further afield by ice sheets lie among the loose stones on the shore.

Fourchu Head Rocks Part 4

Part 4 of a series of photographs taken at Fourchu Head on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, Canada, showing details of rocky outcrops and boulders composed of very ancient Neoproterozoic volcanic rock. They are all made from volcanic ash that was spewed from the volcanoes together with shattered pieces of rock that broke away from the bedrock with the explosive force of the explosion.

Fourchu Head Rocks Part 3

Part 3 of a series of photographs taken at Fourchu Head on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, Canada, showing details of rocky outcrops and boulders composed of very ancient Neoproterozoic volcanic rock.

Fourchu Head Rocks Part 2

Part 2 of a series of photographs taken at Fourchu Head on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, Canada, showing details of rocky outcrops, boulders, beach stones, and pebbles composed of very ancient Neoproterozoic volcanic rock.

Fourchu Head Rocks Part 1

Volcanic rocks belonging to the Fourchu and Main-à-Dieu Sequences can easily be seen on the coastline to the north and south of Louisbourg in Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada. They are around 570 million years old and are part of a complex of Late Precambrian to Early Ordovician rocks largely resulting from the activities of a series of volcanoes that erupted on the Avalonia terrane at the margin of Gondwana.

The volcanic rocks at Fourchu Head are similar in age and type to those at Kennington Cove and Rochefort Point, including pyroclastic rocks composed of fine fragments and particles like ash and crystal tuffs. Additionally, the tuffs contain some very large pyroclastic blocks violently ejected from vents during one of the eruptions. The pebbles derived from the rocks at this site demonstrate an amazing range of colours in every shade of purple, red and green which are particularly evident on wet days.

This is the first of several posts featuring the fascinating array of colours, patterns, and textures in these rocky outcrops, boulders, and pebbles at Fourchu Head.

[We stayed at the most excellent Louisbourg Harbour Inn while we explored this part of Cape Breton Island.]

USEFUL REFERENCES

Atlantic Geoscience Society (2001) The Last Billion Years – A Geological History of the Maritime Provinces of Canada, Nimbus Publishing, Halifax, Nova Scotia, ISBN 1-55109-351-0.

Barr, S. M. (1993) Geochemistry and tectonic setting of late Precambrian volcanic and plutonic rocks in southeastern Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Volume 30, 1147-1154.

Canadian Federation of Earth Sciences (2014) Four Billion Years and Counting – Canada’s Geological Heritage, Nimbus Publishing and Canadian Federation of Earth Sciences, ISBN 978-1-55109-996-5.

Donohoe, H. V. Jnr, White, C. E., Raeside, R. P. and Fisher, B. E, (2005) Geological Highway Map of Nova Scotia, 3rd Edition, Atlantic Geoscience Society Special Publication #1.

Hickman Hild, M. and Barr, S. M. (2015) Geology of Nova Scotia, A Field Guide, Touring through time at 48 scenic sites, Boulder Publications, Portugal Cove-St. Philip’s, Newfoundland and Labrador. ISBN978-1-927099-43-8

Keppie, J. D., Dostal, J., and Murphy, J. B. (1979) Petrology of the Late Precambrian Fourchu Group in the Louisbourg Area, Cape Breton Island, Paper 79-1, Nova Scotia Department of Mines & Energy.