Link

Gone 1080p_00626.jpgGone? is a short computer generated film about revival and hope, with a flock of elegant butterflies in slow motion.

The video from Elyarch is being used by the Natural History Museum in London to draw attention to their forthcoming event called Sensational Butterflies.  Alessandro Giusti, Curator of Lepidoptera, gave the filmmakers a little help with their project at last September’s Science Uncovered event. It’s become a nice allegory for him of the Museum’s project to digitise their own collections to give them new life (see in his latest blog post: http://bit.ly/NHM-An-encouraging-message).

Sensational Butterflies opens on the Museum’s East Lawn on 2 April. Tickets are on sale now: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/sensational-butterflies

Rocks at Redend Point in Studland Bay – 5

Natural iron pipes protruding from the rock on the floor of a cave

A strange phenomenon of the colourful sandstone at Redend Point in Studland Bay is the natural occurrence of hollow pipes or tubes running through the rocks. No-one seems certain about the way they have formed geologically but it is something to do with the way that water-borne iron minerals have settled out in the sandstone.

You can see the open ends of these intriguing features underfoot in the wave cut platform around the base of the cliffs – half concealed sometimes by seaweed and flint pebbles; on the floors of shallow caves where they can resemble small volcanoes; on the ceilings of the undercut rock where you can sometimes see daylight shining through the tubes from higher up in the cliff; broken open in fallen beach boulders and on the cliff face itself; and as strange pedestals at the base of the cliff where the sea has eroded away the softer surrounding rock to isolate the naturally occurring iron-lined hollow pipes.

Natural iron pipes protruding from the rock on the floor of a cave

The openings to natural iron pipes running through sandstone seen on the ceiling of a cave

Natural pipe at the base of a sandstone cliff isolated by the sea eroding the softer surrounding rock

Natural iron-lined pipes exposed by breakage in a beach boulder

Natural iron-lined pipes exposed by breakage in a beach boulder

Natural pipe at the base of a sandstone cliff isolated by the sea eroding the softer surrounding rock

Iron-lined cavities and pipes in Redend Sandstone at Studland Bay

Rocks at Redend Point in Studland Bay – 4

Orange cliff rocks on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

I revisited Redend Point at Studland in Dorset yesterday for the first time in several years. Here are some of the pictures I took. I was only able to look at the north side of the Point because of the state of the tide. The colours seem different from my last trip there. This could be to do with how much rain there has been but also possibly to do with the weathering affect on the iron. [The part of the Point with the wonderful pink and yellow stripes and patterns was further on – to the south of the Point which I could not reach].

More rocks have fallen from the ferruginous sandstone and from the overlying clays. This has brought down a large tree which now lies across the beach. In some areas the sea has undercut the sandstone to produce small caves. These have floors composed of a mixture very fine pale sand, rust-stained flints from the nearby chalk strata around the corner, and bright orange sandstone with pot-holes and eroded channels draining seawards. In this northern part of the Point the colours manifest by the Redend Sandstone seemed less varied than four years ago, and the carved graffiti was much greater than previously noted. Such a shame that almost every surface was disfigured.

Beach boulder and pebbles on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Flint pebbles and boulders on the north side of Redend Point at Studland Bay in Dorset, England.

Flint pebbles on the north side of Redend Point at Studland Bay in Dorset, England.

Beach boulder and pebbles on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Cliff rocks on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Beach boulder and pebbles on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Lower cliff rocks on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Lower cliff rocks on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Lower cliff rocks on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

 Boulder and cliff on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Beach boulder on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Boulder and cliff on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Rocks at Redend Point in Studland Bay – 3

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Several years ago I first posted some of these photographs of Studland Bay rocks but I think it is still worth posting some more now, as it is not every one who will have had the time and patience to burrow through the archives of rock postings on this web log. I never cease to be amazed by the stripe patterns, and the red, yellow, and purple colours of the Redend Sandstone (Creekmoor Sand) at Studland Bay. They are incredible.

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rocks at Redend Point in Studland Bay – 2

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Pink and yellow patterned sandstone with Liesegang rings resulting from the dispersion of iron minerals dissolved in river water percolating through the rock. Photographed at Studland Bay in Dorset, England, in outcrops of Eocene-dated Redend Sandstone (Creekmoor Sand) of the Poole Formation in the Bracklesham Group. These soft sandstones in the low cliffs at the south end of the bay seem to be an irresistible  “canvas” for graffiti artists.

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rocks at Redend Point in Studland Bay – 1

Rock texture, colour, and pattern in Redend Sandstone  at Studland Bay

Examples of rock texture, colour and pattern in Redend Sandstone (also known as Creekmoor Sand) which is a basal member of the Poole Formation (formerly referred to as the Bagshot Formation), of the Bracklesham Group. The pastel almost rainbow colours are caused by iron staining. Hollow pipes (as in the shot immediately below), which can be up to 15 cm diameter and sometimes extend as much as 4 m through the strata, are of unknown origin. The sandstones were laid down in the Eocene.

REFERENCE

Cope, J. C. W., 2012, Geology of the Dorset Coast, Geologists’ Association Guide No. 22, 191-194, ISBN 978-0900717-61-1.

Rock texture, colour, and pattern in Redend Sandstone at Studland Bay

Rock texture, colour, and pattern in Redend Sandstone at Studland Bay

Rock texture, colour, and pattern in Redend Sandstone at Studland Bay

Charlottetown on Prince Edward Island

Aside

Trompe l'oeil of gigantic wild beasts grazing behind an old man on a park bench

Wild Beasts In Charlottetown 1 – Trompe l’oeil effect looking through an art gallery window at two large paintings of native Canadian wild mammals, the glass of the window at the same time reflecting a man seated on a bench beneath some trees on the opposite side of the road. The two superimposed images make it seem that two giant animals are grazing peacefully behind the man. Victoria Street, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island in Atlantic Canada.

I spent less than three fleeting days on Prince Edward Island in Atlantic Canada. It is a beautiful and fun place to be – about 230 km long and varying in width from 7 to 50 km, and lying in the southern part of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, with the Northumberland Strait separating it from Nova Scotia.

I was drawn, of course, to the natural subjects like jellyfish swimming in the harbour, surf clams on the beach, and the wonderful red rocks, and water patterns on the beach and in the sea …. but there was so much more to see and enjoy, including people, architecture, and public art. Although we were based in Charlottetown for just a couple of nights, I managed to get around and capture lots of shots to remind me of the atmosphere in the town; and I have already published some of these photographs on my other blog Photographic Salmagundi. Perhaps you would enjoy looking at some of the sights too?

Out and about in old Charlottetown, PEI (1)

Out and about in old Charlottetown, PEI (2)

Out and about in old Charlottetown, PEI (3)

Out and about in old Charlottetown, PEI (4)

Out and about in old Charlottetown, PEI (5)