About winderjssc

Jessica Winder has a background in ecological studies in both the museum and the research laboratory. She is passionate about the natural world right on our doorsteps. She is enthusiastic about capturing what she sees through photography and wants to open the eyes of everyone to the beauty and fascination of nature. She is author of 'Jessica's Nature Blog' at https://natureinfocus.wordpress.com. Jessica has also extensively researched macroscopic variations in oyster and other edible marine mollusc shells from archaeological excavations as a means of understanding past exploitation of marine shellfish resources. She is an archaeo-malacological consultant through Oysters etc. and is publishing summaries of her shell research work on the WordPress Blog called 'Oysters etc.' at http://oystersetcetera.wordpress.com 'Photographic Salmagundi' at http://photosalmagundi.wordpress.com is a showcase of photographs and digital art on all sorts of subjects - not just natural history.

Rocks at Redend Point in Studland Bay – 4

Orange cliff rocks on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

I revisited Redend Point at Studland in Dorset yesterday for the first time in several years. Here are some of the pictures I took. I was only able to look at the north side of the Point because of the state of the tide. The colours seem different from my last trip there. This could be to do with how much rain there has been but also possibly to do with the weathering affect on the iron. [The part of the Point with the wonderful pink and yellow stripes and patterns was further on – to the south of the Point which I could not reach].

More rocks have fallen from the ferruginous sandstone and from the overlying clays. This has brought down a large tree which now lies across the beach. In some areas the sea has undercut the sandstone to produce small caves. These have floors composed of a mixture very fine pale sand, rust-stained flints from the nearby chalk strata around the corner, and bright orange sandstone with pot-holes and eroded channels draining seawards. In this northern part of the Point the colours manifest by the Redend Sandstone seemed less varied than four years ago, and the carved graffiti was much greater than previously noted. Such a shame that almost every surface was disfigured.

Beach boulder and pebbles on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Flint pebbles and boulders on the north side of Redend Point at Studland Bay in Dorset, England.

Flint pebbles on the north side of Redend Point at Studland Bay in Dorset, England.

Beach boulder and pebbles on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Cliff rocks on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Beach boulder and pebbles on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Lower cliff rocks on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Lower cliff rocks on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Lower cliff rocks on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

 Boulder and cliff on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Beach boulder on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Boulder and cliff on the north side of Redend Point in Studland Bay, Dorset, England.

Rocks at Redend Point in Studland Bay – 3

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Several years ago I first posted some of these photographs of Studland Bay rocks but I think it is still worth posting some more now, as it is not every one who will have had the time and patience to burrow through the archives of rock postings on this web log. I never cease to be amazed by the stripe patterns, and the red, yellow, and purple colours of the Redend Sandstone (Creekmoor Sand) at Studland Bay. They are incredible.

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rocks at Redend Point in Studland Bay – 2

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Pink and yellow patterned sandstone with Liesegang rings resulting from the dispersion of iron minerals dissolved in river water percolating through the rock. Photographed at Studland Bay in Dorset, England, in outcrops of Eocene-dated Redend Sandstone (Creekmoor Sand) of the Poole Formation in the Bracklesham Group. These soft sandstones in the low cliffs at the south end of the bay seem to be an irresistible  “canvas” for graffiti artists.

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rock colour, pattern, and texture in Creekmoor Sand (Redend Sandstone) at Studland Bay

Rocks at Redend Point in Studland Bay – 1

Rock texture, colour, and pattern in Redend Sandstone  at Studland Bay

Examples of rock texture, colour and pattern in Redend Sandstone (also known as Creekmoor Sand) which is a basal member of the Poole Formation (formerly referred to as the Bagshot Formation), of the Bracklesham Group. The pastel almost rainbow colours are caused by iron staining. Hollow pipes (as in the shot immediately below), which can be up to 15 cm diameter and sometimes extend as much as 4 m through the strata, are of unknown origin. The sandstones were laid down in the Eocene.

REFERENCE

Cope, J. C. W., 2012, Geology of the Dorset Coast, Geologists’ Association Guide No. 22, 191-194, ISBN 978-0900717-61-1.

Rock texture, colour, and pattern in Redend Sandstone at Studland Bay

Rock texture, colour, and pattern in Redend Sandstone at Studland Bay

Rock texture, colour, and pattern in Redend Sandstone at Studland Bay

Charlottetown on Prince Edward Island

Aside

Trompe l'oeil of gigantic wild beasts grazing behind an old man on a park bench

Wild Beasts In Charlottetown 1 – Trompe l’oeil effect looking through an art gallery window at two large paintings of native Canadian wild mammals, the glass of the window at the same time reflecting a man seated on a bench beneath some trees on the opposite side of the road. The two superimposed images make it seem that two giant animals are grazing peacefully behind the man. Victoria Street, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island in Atlantic Canada.

I spent less than three fleeting days on Prince Edward Island in Atlantic Canada. It is a beautiful and fun place to be – about 230 km long and varying in width from 7 to 50 km, and lying in the southern part of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, with the Northumberland Strait separating it from Nova Scotia.

I was drawn, of course, to the natural subjects like jellyfish swimming in the harbour, surf clams on the beach, and the wonderful red rocks, and water patterns on the beach and in the sea …. but there was so much more to see and enjoy, including people, architecture, and public art. Although we were based in Charlottetown for just a couple of nights, I managed to get around and capture lots of shots to remind me of the atmosphere in the town; and I have already published some of these photographs on my other blog Photographic Salmagundi. Perhaps you would enjoy looking at some of the sights too?

Out and about in old Charlottetown, PEI (1)

Out and about in old Charlottetown, PEI (2)

Out and about in old Charlottetown, PEI (3)

Out and about in old Charlottetown, PEI (4)

Out and about in old Charlottetown, PEI (5)

Permian Red Beds at Lord Selkirk Park, PEI

View along the shoreline at Lord Selkirk Provincial Park in Prince Edward Island, Canada, with lush green early summer vegetation and red Permian rocks.

Views along the shoreline at Lord Selkirk Provincial Park, on the south coast of Prince Edward Island in Canada, show the red Permian sedimentary rock layers in low cliffs, and as mud beneath the water of the Northumberland Strait. The lush vibrant green of the new season’s vegetation makes a striking contrast to the outcropping red beds.

The whole of Prince Edward Island is underlain by Permian rocks which also extend outwards to New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. They date from around 255 million years ago and were laid down between the Carboniferous period which came before it and the Triassic period which followed it. Towards the end of the Carboniferous, the climate started to warm up and dry out; and this marked the end of the vast wetland forests and swamps that had been so characteristic of the Carboniferous and that are recorded by numerous plant fossils and extensive coal measures.

The plants and trees that continued to grow in the Permian Period were mainly those which were resistant to drought, like conifers, although some plants such as tree ferns persisted in the wetter ares.  Remains of these plants have been preserved as fossils in the Permian rocks. The terrestrial red beds of Prince Edward Island have also preserved the bones of vertebrates, reptiles, that were washed down rivers in monsoon flash floods and became buried in pebbles and debris. At Point Prim, very close to Lord Selkirk Provincial Park, trace fossils of one of these mammal-like reptiles has been found. We were not lucky enough to find fossils of any kind while we were there as our visit was so fleeting.

Stephanian to late Early Permian rocks occur in and under PEI. The fields, so famous for their potato crops, are a distinctive red colour, indicating the rock type from which the soil is derived. The rocks themselves are best seen outcropping along the coast – in fact one of the first things you notice as you cross the Confederation Bridge to get to the island is the continuous thin red rocky line along the miles of southern shore.

The Permian strata on PEI are divided into different phases, and those shown in the photographs here, from Lord Selkirk Park near Point Prim, belong to the Wood islands Member, which together with the Malpeque Member to its west, comprise the relatively recently-designated Hillsborough River Formation, that belongs to the Northumberland Strait Supergroup. The rocks are made up of conglomerates, sandstones, and mudstones.

REFERENCES

van de Poll, H. W., 1989, Lithostratigraphy of Prince Edward Island redbeds, Atlantic Geology, 25, 23-35.

Atlantic Geoscience Society, 2001, The Last Billion Years: A Geological History of the Maritime Provinces of Canada, Nimbus Publishing, ISBN1-55 109-351-0, Atlantic Geoscience Society Special Publication No 15.

Bow Wave on the Northumberland Strait Ferry

Water texture and pattern in the wake of a ferry crossing the still waters of the Northumberland Strait in Canada

As the ferry ploughed the still water of the Northumberland Strait, on the crossing from Wood Holes on Prince Edward Island to Pictou in Nova Scotia, it cast curtains of foam-flecked swell to port and starboard, and the vibrations from the engines sent millions of micro-ripples across the smooth surface into the distance.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them and see details such as the vibration ripples from the ship’s engines.