Rocks at Fermoyle on the Dingle Peninsula

Red Devonian sandstone rocks at the beach with fucoid seaweeds

The place where I took these photographs is marked on the map as an island but it is actually just a tiny promontory near to the village of Fermoyle, along the Dingle Way, on the north coast of the Dingle Peninsula in Ireland. I am sure that most people visit the location for its wonderful long unsullied sandy beach. However, I was drawn to this particular part, at the extreme western end of the beach, because of its fascinating geomorphology. The rocks are sandstones and conglomerates (mostly but not exclusively red) of the Glengarriff Harbour Group from the Devonian Period. The bright olive, lime, yellow and orange colours of the seaweeds, and the black, yellow and white of encrusting lichens, clash garishly with the red rocks. The rock strata are clearly defined: sometimes on-end, sometimes as flat bedding planes, and in one place a dome of strata lies cut-away and exposed. Beach stones rather than pebbles cover a portion of this area; and there are also occasional huge boulders composed of conglomerate scattered along the shore nearest the inlet from Brandon Bay.

Rocks at Clogher Bay 3

Silurian rock at Clogher Bay in Dingle

View of cliffs at Clogher Bay with human figure for scaleThis is the third in a series of photographs of Silurian rocks from Clogher Bay. A brief examination of the literature indicates that the rocks in these pictures belong to the Drom Point Formation which has accumulated to a depth of 300 metres and is part of the Dunquin Group of Silurian Period strata in Ireland. The Drom Point and Croagh-marhin Formations consist of shallow-marine, fossiliferous siltstones and very fine to fine grained sandstones.

Rock colour and texture boulders and cliff in Silurian Period silt stones and sandstones from the Drompoint Formation in Dingle

Rock colour and texture with Chondrites trace fossils in Silurian Period silt stones and sandstones from the Drompoint Formation in Dingle

Rock colour and texture in Silurian Period silt stones and sandstones from the Drompoint Formation in Dingle

Rock colour and texture in Silurian Period silt stones and sandstones from the Drompoint Formation in Dingle

Rock colour and texture with preserved sand ripples in Silurian Period silt stones and sandstones from the Drompoint Formation in Dingle

Rock colour and texture in Silurian Period silt stones and sandstones from the Drompoint Formation in Dingle

Rock colour and texture in Silurian Period silt stones and sandstones from the Drompoint Formation in Dingle

Rock colour and texture in Silurian Period silt stones and sandstones from the Drompoint Formation in Dingle

Rock colour and texture in Silurian Period silt stones and sandstones from the Drompoint Formation in Dingle

Rocks at Ferriters Cove 9

Cliff of Silurian strata at Ferriter CoveBy the time I had reached the northernmost edge of the beach at Ferriters Cove, the Silurian rocks had changed their appearance again. The cliff here is higher and composed of a wonderful patchwork of mainly yellow slabs with purple-grey markings. Many of these slabs have fallen to the shore in a thick loose layer. Among these pieces of stone I found some more fossils, internal casts and impressions of brachiopods, including different species to the one I found earlier (I thought that might be Leptaena sp.). Two particular brachiopods are mentioned on the sign at the entrance to the beach, Holcospirifer (bigugosus?) and Rhipidium (hibernicum?), and it is likely that the fossils in images 57b,c,& d belong to one or both of those species. I am wondering if the much larger regular rounded fossil in image 57a is a species of Atrypa.

REFERENCE

Bassett, M. G., Cocks, L. R. M., and Holland C.H. (1976) The affinities of two endemic Silurian brachiopods from the Dingle Peninsula, Ireland, Palaeontology, Vol. 19, Part 4, pp. 615 – 625, pls. 93-95.

Rocks at Ferriters Cove 8

Natural abstract design in Silurian rock at Ferriters Cove

Water-worn, soft, and stripey Silurian sedimentary rocks make sporadic appearances through the sandy beach at Ferriters Cove and sometimes they can have a strangely sculptural appearance, or even of a landscape in miniature, depending on the perspective from which they are photographed. I also particularly like the pale blue-green colour contrasting with the muted yellow that contributes to the natural abstract striped designs.

You can click on an image to enlarge it.

Silurian rocks on the beach at Ferriters Cove

Silurian rocks on the beach at Ferriters Cove

Silurian rocks on the beach at Ferriters Cove

Silurian rocks on the beach at Ferriters Cove

Silurian rocks on the beach at Ferriters Cove

Silurian rocks on the beach at Ferriters Cove

Silurian rocks on the beach at Ferriters Cove

Rocks at Ferriters Cove 7

Natural pattern, shape, and texture in Silurian bedrock at Ferriters Cove

The last part of the Silurian strata exposure of the small rocky promontory at Ferriters Cove, before the wide sandy strip with beach stones, is very abstract…. but not so sculptural in appearance as the patches of water-worn mudstones that emerge here and there through the sand – see the next post!